A Road Trip Through My Daughter’s Eyes

It is tempting to tell our children what they see, but it is beautiful to listen to them tell us. A family road trip reminded me of this.
I’m watching Sydney watch the changing scenery through the window of our van.

It is tempting to tell our children what they see, but it is beautiful to listen to them tell us.
It is tempting to tell our children what they see, but it is beautiful to listen to them tell us.

We have traveled 650 miles in just over a day. We have moved through ever changing scenery; desert turned to forest, cacti to evergreens, and slowly, the desert sand is turning to vegetation. The temperature has dropped by 40 degrees, and we have played in snow in flip flops.As I watch Sydney’s little face take it all in, I am tempted to interpret it for her; to share with her exactly what I see. But that is my experience, not hers.I have shared some of my observations, and offered to open conversation, but this is her trip. I do not want her to see it as I do.Though she only turned 4 last week, this ride is shaping her. It is becoming a part of her. Somewhere, and some time, she will pull from these days of watching the land change, though she may not recall it.

Keeping ourselves quiet so that our children can have their own experience, is tough. "A Road Trip Through My Daughter's Eyes" by Jennifer Andersen OurMuddyBoots.com
It is tempting to tell our children what they see, but it is beautiful to listen to them tell us. “A Road Trip Through My Daughter’s Eyes” by Jennifer Andersen OurMuddyBoots.com

I’m taking photographs, and keeping a log, so that both of my children have a record of it. That is my part; recording my experience as their mother.

Keeping ourselves quiet so that our children can have their own experience, is tough. "A Road Trip Through My Daughter's Eyes" by Jennifer Andersen OurMuddyBoots.com
Keeping ourselves quiet so that our children can have their own experience, is tough. “A Road Trip Through My Daughter’s Eyes” by Jennifer Andersen OurMuddyBoots.com

So as I watch my daughter’s face as she looks through our van’s window, I will keep my mouth closed. Rather than telling her what she should see, I will look forward to the day when she tells me all about it.

3 Replies to “A Road Trip Through My Daughter’s Eyes”

  1. Such a lovely concept! My daughter is just learning to speak and it’s lovely to have her walk home from nursery with me pointing out every single door and every single car because they’re her latest words! Kids often point out the things we are so jaded to that we don’t see.

    • Year ago when mine were little I read about ‘toddler time’ and it was the concept of seeing the world and experiencing time as a toddler. They stop and really see the flowers when we pass them by. What a delicious time of time!

  2. Love the way you respect your children as humans. Not that many parents approach their children as fully formed humans, deserving to be treated as people not “little” kids. Reminds me of when my kids were younger. It was so obvious to my husband and me that our kids had full personalities from the very beginning.